RESEARCH

Image of a small baby with numerous words related to pre-natal testing projected across its body.

Image of a small baby with numerous words related to pre-natal testing projected across its body.

My present area of focus is the applied field of bioethics, specifically the bioethics of technology. All my current research and publication addresses clinical practice and technology development. The purpose of this work is to influence how bioethics intersects with built environments. My goal is to translate bioethical issues in technology use and development into public policy conversations, ethical decisions, and material practice. In short, I am working within the theoretical and applied field of bioethics to make what I call “the case for conserving disability.” To make this case, my current research investigates how technologies make built environments that sustain the inclusion and the existence of people with disabilities.

This focus on bioethics expands my earlier body of work on cultural representations and aesthetic products.  My current work aims to integrate disability studies with bioethics and technology studies, where disability is still significantly undertheorized and underrepresented. To that end, my recent publications on disability appear (and are in process) in bioethics journals such as The Journal of Bioethical Inquiry and Hypatia, while other work appears in venues such as Disability Studies Quarterly and American Quarterly. To credential myself in the field of bioethics, I earned a bioethics certificate from the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University in 2009 and am now well through the MA in bioethics at Emory. I am sufficiently established in the field of bioethics to have been invited to give a plenary address at the annual meeting of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) in November of 2013. I regularly present my research on bioethics and technology. During my recent Radcliffe Fellowship, for example, I collaborated at The Berkman Center for Internet and Society, the MIT assistive technology lab (CSAIL), and The Harvard School of Education on the topics of technology design and disability. At Emory, I am working with the Digital Humanities Center at the Digital Scholarship Commons (DiSC), where I keynoted a recent symposium on accessible technology. I have recently also published modest pieces as a public scholar on accessible technology and disability studies in The New York Times, The New Yorker, and The Huffington Post, and have a tentatively forthcoming article in The Chronicle of Higher Education.